Tourists’ terrifying Outback encounter

 

Video has captured the moment travellers driving through the Northern Territory became suddenly surrounded by about 30 saltwater crocodiles.

The car was making its way down the notorious Cahills Crossing in Arnhem Land when it was forced to stop as the slow-moving reptiles crossed its path after emerging from crocodile-infested waters.

 

A car became surrounded by about 30 saltwater crocodiles at notorious Cahills Crossing. Picture: Kimberley Off-Road Adventure Tours
A car became surrounded by about 30 saltwater crocodiles at notorious Cahills Crossing. Picture: Kimberley Off-Road Adventure Tours

 

Kimberley Off-Road Adventure Tours, which posted the video of the car ahead on Facebook, said the crocs began to emerge from the murky water as the tide changed.

"There were over 30 salties in there," the post read.

"This car went through after us and had a bit of trouble with the peak hour traffic."

 

The car was forced to wait until the slow-moving crocodiles cleared the path. Picture: Kimberley Off-Road Adventure Tours
The car was forced to wait until the slow-moving crocodiles cleared the path. Picture: Kimberley Off-Road Adventure Tours

 

Cahills Crossing, about three hours east of Darwin, provides the only road access point between Arnhem Land and Kakadu National Park, but it's considered one of the most dangerous bodies of water in Australia.

It's notorious for dangerous water flow capable of upturning cars as well as the massive community of crocodiles lurking in the water.

 

Cahills Crossing is one of Australia’s most notorious bodies of water. Picture: ourendlesssummerc.t
Cahills Crossing is one of Australia’s most notorious bodies of water. Picture: ourendlesssummerc.t

 

A tragic number of deaths have occurred at the crossing. One of the most infamous incidents involved 40-year-old Kerry McLoughlin, who was fishing with mates when he was taken by a crocodile that launched from the water and decapitated him in 1987.

In 2017, a man was killed by a 3.5m croc while wading across Cahills Crossing.

Each year, dozens of brazen drivers attempt to make it across the submerged crossing but instead end up being washed away into the croc-infested waters.

In best-case scenarios, cars are forced to wait as crocodiles slowly cross their path.

Earlier this week, Darwin woman Sami-Lea Rutledge filmed a 4.5m saltie as it stopped in front of a car while crossing the road, forcing the driver to wait about five minutes.

"You could see in the video the car was going back and forth and they wouldn't get off the road," Ms Rutledge told the NT News.

"It was hilarious. There was probably about 10 people in total just watching."


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