YOUR STORY: Coast OnScreen president Phil Moore, back, on the job making one of the collective's short films. Now he's showing Seniors how they can make their own films with basic skills and equipment.
YOUR STORY: Coast OnScreen president Phil Moore, back, on the job making one of the collective's short films. Now he's showing Seniors how they can make their own films with basic skills and equipment.

Take your family's story to the Silver Screen

COAST OnScreen (COS) is giving Seniors a chance to learn how to tell their story on film and share it at the Silver Screen Short Film Festival in February.

While that may seem very fast, COS president Phil Moore, who will teach the course, says Seniors shouldn't feel intimidated.

"You'll be guided every step of the way," he said.

With the assistance of a Central Coast Council grant, Coast OnScreen is providing four half-day workshops across February in which anyone over 50 can learn aspects of short film, how to set up shots, story development, sound and editing techniques and finalise their film ready for its debut on Sunday, February 24.

Each story will run five minutes and can be anything from a scripted piece to a documentary to a montage of family photos, sharing a hobby, an area, an event, or your life story - whatever is important to you.

The not-for-profit collective, which Phil said offers the only film courses on the Coast, has offered similar programs to youth and mixed groups, but this is the first to specifically target Seniors.

The aim is to promote inclusion, let Seniors try new things and share their stories.

Participants are encouraged to use their own smart phones or digital cameras to film, edit on their own laptops or the computers at the group's Erina Fair hub, and will use free HitFilm Express software for editing.

"The idea is to teach them the basic fundamentals of filmmaking skills using the limited gear they have so they can keep making films," Phil said.

Whether that's just for friends and family, to share on YouTube or the start of a new hobby, Phil said is completely up to participants.

Some may never have made a film before, others may have created home movies on actual film or video, but be unsure how to use newer technology.

Class size is 12-15 people, to ensure everyone gets one-on-one attention particularly during editing, but you can also work in pairs or small groups.

"The aim is just to encourage people to make something, and the best way to learn how to do anything is to get out there and do it ... feel free to make mistakes," he said.

Silver Screen registrations open on January 2.

The free workshops will run 10am-2pm Sundays, February 3-17 and Wednesday, February 20, before the film festival on Sunday February 24.

To find out more go to coastonscreen.org/ or send an email to info@coastonscreen.org.


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