Put on your walking shoes for Steptember fundraising

STEPTEMBER is Australia's leading Health and Wellness fundraising initiative of the year - raising vital funds for children, teenagers and adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

It is a win-win fundraiser - anyone can participate, get fit and raise money for people with cerebral palsy at the same time.

It is based on the premise that the average Australian worker takes less than one-third of the recommended daily steps, or equivalent exercise (3000 steps), during the month of September.

The Steptember campaign is asking participants to reach 10,000 steps a day.

Teams of four are given pedometers to wear and log their daily activity online.

Steptember is accessible to everyone: you don't need to run a marathon to be able to take part.

You can walk the 10,000 steps each day or do a range of up to 40 other activities, including a pilates class which will amount to 4160 steps, yoga class 4060 steps, swimming 6048 steps, wheelchair basketball 5106 steps, cycling, soccer, gym work, zumba, football, surfing and more.

Their equivalent in steps is all outlined on the Steptember website.

Cerebral Palsy Alliance is a highly respected and much loved organisation at the cutting edge of disability therapy and research.

Last year 36,000 people took part and this year we are anticipating almost 60,000 people will take part, including massive support from various corporations in Australia and their employees, helping to reach the fundraising goal of $5 million in 2015.

More than 250 organisations have already signed up to Steptember 2015.

More info


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