DOING IT FOR DEMENTIA: Country singer Snowy Robson has been inspired by Glen Campbell's story and a friend's experiences to use his voice to raise funds for Dementia Australia.
DOING IT FOR DEMENTIA: Country singer Snowy Robson has been inspired by Glen Campbell's story and a friend's experiences to use his voice to raise funds for Dementia Australia.

Snowy's fund-raising show doing it for dementia

SNOWY Robson has been entertaining people for 53 years but, over recent years, has dedicated himself to raising funds for Dementia Australia.

"I'm that old, I'm in the museum," Snowy (aka Doug) laughed, clarifying that his one-time band Nevada is featured in Newcastle Museum's Bands that Rocked the Hunter exhibition.

With a career that started in the 1960s, he swapped to country music in 1981, touring internationally, being nominated for several Mo Awards and winning best solo in 2014, as well as being nominated for four Golden Guitars at Tamworth.

On Sunday, September 29 he is encouraging Central Coast country music-lovers to help him make a difference by attending his comeback Concert for Dementia at Gosford RSL.

It's not a John Farnham-style "return", Snowy has had a stroke and heart problems over recent years, and his last fundraiser was 18 months ago.

But he said, "life's too short not to give back" and "it's going to be a lot of good music and a lot of fun".

His show, which features a tribute to stars "gone but not forgotten", such as Glen Campbell, Johnny Cash, Elvis and Jim Reeves, has the support of none-other- than Frank Ifield.

The 81-year-old Ifield, who lost his mum to dementia, no longer sings but as patron of Snowy's shows hopes to make an appearance on stage to tell a few stories of his heyday.

"He's one of the nicest guys you'd ever meet, patron of a lot of causes and still helping young people today," Snowy said.

His own interest in dementia was sparked by the plight of American country legend Glen Campbell, of whom he was "a huge fan", who died in 2017 of Alzheimer's disease aged 81.

Speaking to a friend about Campbell having been unable to recognise his own daughter in family movies, the friend's comment that, "you don't have to be famous to have dementia, you know", made him decide to take action.

"It's such a cruel, cruel disease, and it's such a lottery - it can strike anyone," Snowy said.

His deep voice breaks as he speaks of a friend currently "slipping away" with the disease.

Snowy has undertaken a Dementia Australia orientation course, and before his comeback had raised $7500 for the cause - with hopes of doubling that with ongoing performances in the coming year.

The $10 ticket price of his 2pm September 29 Gosford RSL show will go to dementia research, as will profits from his CD, Gentle On My Mind, in tribute to Campbell ($15).

To find out more, go to snowyrobson.com or book at Gosford RSL reception. Phone (02) 4323 2311.


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