Scientists: Genes may be reason you're naughty or nice

SCIENTISTS have uncovered a mathematical model of predicting the likelihood of an individual being nasty or nice. 

The team of scientists discovered various behavioural trends through studying colony-living creatures, such as bees, and are now better able to explain why some are likely to take on a more selfless mode of functioning, where they look out for the good of their neighbours, while others are content loving off other creatures and exploiting them. 

The model was initially created by Dr Sasha Dall from the University of Exeter, in Devon, United Kingdom, along with a group of international researchers. 

The study took into account the environmental factors as well as genetic traits that can help predict an individual's behavioural inclination.

They found that individuals are pre-programmed with instructions on how to behave, therefore determining their response to a given situation. 

Until now, scientists have been unable to fully explain how this 'genetic polymorphism' plays into the behaviour of indivisuals. 

"Social evolution theory hasn't previously addressed genetic polymorphism," said Stockholm University's lead author of the study Professor Olof Leimar to Daily News and Analysis. 

"We have developed a model that allows us to explore this within a general framework alongside other behavioural influences."

The study, Genes as Cues of Relatedness and Social Evolution in Heterogeneous Environments, is published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.


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