Bernard Howe, of Reesvill,e with the 1923 model T Ford one-tonne truck.
Bernard Howe, of Reesvill,e with the 1923 model T Ford one-tonne truck. Contributed

Road to restoration for classic car

A 1923 Model T Ford one-tonne truck housed at the Nambour Museum is very lucky.

Lucky because the classic icon of motoring past is being given a new lease on life thanks to a new volunteer at the museum.

Bernard Howe, from Reesville, comes with experience in restoring older cars - a 1955 Ford Mainline ute, a 1962 MGA, and a 1938 Essex.

Bernard offered his help after noticing a newspaper article asking for men to volunteer for museum duties of a masculine ilk.

When president Clive Plater discovered Bernard's skills he knew exactly what project he could give him.

"For years the Ford has been sitting in one of our sheds waiting for someone who had the time and skills to restore it and Bernard has agreed to take on the task," he said.

Bernard is delighted with the challenge.

He said, now he is retired, his fingers are itching to do something different in his spare time, after he has done the gardening and looking after the grandchildren.

Hours of patient labour will be given to the restoration work and both men agree it will be well worth it in the end.

Mr Plater said if any readers have spare Model T Ford parts in their shed, they may consider offering them to the museum.


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