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Penalty rates reduction just doesn't add up

A reader is questioning how reducing the income of those paid least in the community leave us better off?
A reader is questioning how reducing the income of those paid least in the community leave us better off? Rawpixel

SO WHAT is the business case for reducing penalty rates?

How will reducing the income of those paid least in the community leave us better off?

Some supporters claim it will make businesses viable.

So much for the idea that employees faced with pay cuts will be able to work longer hours to offset the loss of income.

Others propose it's to give business owners time off (Daily, February 25).

A pay rise at the employee's expense.

Because we live in a 24 x 7 economy. Whatever that means.

It's particularly popular amongst those who work from 8-5. Such as the Fair Work Commission.

It will be good for the economy.

Except how will taking consumption out of a consumption-based economy create the jobs and prosperity?

It's just more voodoo economics.

When did this country become so pathetically myopic and mean?

Or has our belief of 'a fair go' never been more than a fiction?

ANDREW MORAN

Battery Hill

Topics:  penalty rates


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