NEW BOOK: Liane Moriarty doesn't disappoint in her latest novel, Nine Perfect Strangers.
NEW BOOK: Liane Moriarty doesn't disappoint in her latest novel, Nine Perfect Strangers.

Nine Perfect Strangers and one very strange resort

LIANE Moriarty has produced another superb tale in her novel Nine Perfect Strangers.

I picked up a copy of Liane's latest novel at the airport the other day. I took hold of it in trepidation that it would now be as good as her other seven international bestsellers, several of which I have read.

Luckily, my choice proved a good one.

Liane has again created an engaging tale. It's setting is familiar, it's characters easy to get attached to. The subject - well, who hasn't dreamt of going to a health retreat to get some rest and maybe loose just a little bit of weight? Though, I'm not no sure this retreat would stay on your bucket list once you read what it has to offer.

Tranquillum House is a place for health and wellness experiences, so the brochure says. It also promises total transformation.

We meet at the retreat nine city residents. Each character has a deep story.

The retreat's overseer and owner, Masha, is something quite different. I can't say more as I don't want to spoil what you find when you meet her for the first time.

The innocence of the strangers as to what this retreat will drive them to say and do - well you have to read Liane's entertaining, surprising and quite interesting take on what you might just experience if you were lucky, or unlucky, to be a visitor to the unconvential Tranquillum House.

Published by Pan Macmillan, Nine Perfect Strangers is in bookshops now in paperback for RRP$32.99 and ebook for $14.99


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