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National Seniors chief executive steps down after 10 years

Michael O'Neill is the chief executive officer of National Seniors Association Australia.
Michael O'Neill is the chief executive officer of National Seniors Association Australia. Contributed

MICHAEL O'Neill has announced he's stepping down as National Seniors chief executive from the end of May.

Mr O'Neill, who has been at the helm of the over-50s lobby for almost a decade, believes it is time for 'fresh blood and fresh ideas'.  

"When I commenced this role in 2006, I received a legacy of 30 years of growth and development," said Mr O'Neill.  

"I leave at the 40 year mark, confident that the organisation is in good shape with a bright future."  

National Seniors chairman David Carvosso said Mr O'Neill had been an outstanding lobbyist for older Australians with both government and big business.  

"Michael started with National Seniors in 2006, promising to stay for five years. We are fortunate that he has stayed in the job for nearly a decade."  

"He goes with our good wishes sure in the knowledge that he has laid down strong foundations for his successor," said Mr Carvosso.  

The National Seniors board has embarked on a thorough and comprehensive process in the search for a new chief executive with a replacement to be announced in May.  

Mr O'Neill intends to remain in the workforce.  

Topics:  chief executive officer national seniors seniors seniors news


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