CLOSE EYE: Lockyer Valley Regional Council pest management officer Henri-Paul Blanco inspects a field of fast spreading fireweed in Mulgowie.
CLOSE EYE: Lockyer Valley Regional Council pest management officer Henri-Paul Blanco inspects a field of fast spreading fireweed in Mulgowie. Ali Kuchel

Fiery little pest is on the march

SMALL and somewhat pretty, the yellow Fireweed might not look like a pest.

But the aggressive weed, native to Madagascar and southern Africa, could severely impact agriculture in the Lockyer Valley if it's not removed from pastures.

In a bid to combat Fireweed, the Lockyer Valley Regional Council is calling upon residents for a working bee to pick and dispose of the weed before it spreads further.

The distinctive 13-petal flower can rapidly reproduce, dispersing tiny seeds if sprayed by pesticides. The working bee on September 17, will target areas in Mulgowie.

If landholders suspect they have Fireweed growing at their property, they are urged to take a sample to council for inspection.

LVRC will place a moratorium on tip charges until the end of November for any resident who upon inspection, presents to either the Laidley or Gatton Landfill sites with Fireweed.

To help combat Fireweed at the working bee, register at www.lockyervalley.qld. gov. au or call 1300 005 872.


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