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'Economic windfall' from M'boro's RV friendly declaration

Nancy Bates, Cr Anne Maddern, Richard Mainey, Cr Chris Loft, Darryl Stewart, Nan Ott and Cr Paul Truscott with the sign declaring Maryborough an RV friendly town.
Nancy Bates, Cr Anne Maddern, Richard Mainey, Cr Chris Loft, Darryl Stewart, Nan Ott and Cr Paul Truscott with the sign declaring Maryborough an RV friendly town. Blake Antrobus

IT'S been a lengthy process of lobbying, council votes and community support to get the grey nomads here.

But the ongoing fight has been worth it, as Maryborough was finally declared an RV friendly town.

The announcement from the Campervan and Motorhome Club of Australia means Maryborough is officially on the map for grey nomads, allowing travellers to identify places with the necessary facilities to stay during their stopovers.

Councillor Paul Truscott said it was essentially "a good foothold to attract extra travellers to the region".

"Having that status, anyone is a member of the CMCA will recognise us as a town to stop in. It gives us a firm stance to show we welcome travellers to stay in town," he said.

It comes as welcome news for Maryborough RV Working Party coordinator Nan Ott, who has campaigned tirelessly to have the label stick.

"After two-and-a-half years of lobbying council, it's come to fruition," she said.

"It's excellent news; I'm hoping it will bring a good stream of tourists to Maryborough and boost tourism all round.

"Once we see tourists coming in numbers, we're hoping to do a count of dockets to see what they've spent in town; it will surprise a lot of people to see how much they do spend," she said.

CMCA's declaration also means that Maryborough will be promoted to RV travellers across Australia through the CMCA magazine, website and social media, encouraging travellers to extend their stay in the town.

MARYBOROUGH has finally been declared an RV friendly town, after almost a year of lobbying from the Fraser Coast Regional Council and local tourism groups.

Fraser Coast mayor Chris Loft said it was a "red letter day" for tourists visiting the Fraser Coast, stating this was exactly what the community wanted.

"This is what the community is all about; there is great change coming, especially for Maryborough," he said.

"I'd encourage everybody to go down and say G'day just to welcome people. We are a caring and welcoming community, and that's what RVs want."

The RV friendly status will also encourage travellers to stay longer and spend more of their budget in town, capitalising on what Maryborough chamber of commerce president Lance Stone calls "the drive market."

"It's purely and simply an economic windfall...there are significant billions spent in Queensland (on this industry)," he said.

"The idea of being RV friendly is to stay longer. There's nothing to stop us from becoming the RV capital of Australia, as we're now well-placed to contend for that title."

"This is what the commuunity is all about; there is great change coming, especially for Maryborough," he said.

"I'd encourage everybody to go down and say 'G'day' just to welcome people. We are a caring and welcoming community, and that's what RV's want."

Cr Paul Truscott thanked the efforts of Nancy Bates and Nan Ott for their efforts in pushing for the declaration.

"If not for the work of Nancy and Nan this wouldn't have come through. This is a momentous occasion for the Fraser Coast," he said.
 

Topics:  fccommunity fccouncil fctourism grey nomads maryborough rv friendly


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