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Dignified and practical dining fashion with a twist

DIGNIFIED DINING: Ruth happily wears her Picasso spillwear at every meal time at IRT St Georges Basin Care.
DIGNIFIED DINING: Ruth happily wears her Picasso spillwear at every meal time at IRT St Georges Basin Care. Marianne Van Luyken

RUTH is a very happy customer; she's wearing the newest in dining fashion designed by Australian small business Spillwear.

"Ruth is thrilled with this product," co-founder Marianne Van Luyken said.

"She tells me that not only does she wear it at every meal time at IRT St Georges Basin Care facility, it always goes with her when she visits her family."

Marianne, with her friend Margarete De Jong, have designed and had manufactured what they consider is a unique and highly useful product for aged care and disabled adults.

Most residents, like Marianne's 88-year-old mother, don't like to wear bibs, often it's a necessity because of spillage.

"My mother was determined not to wear one. She would pull lots of faces," Marianne said.

"They (bibs) looked like really big bibs.

"They are usually made of terry-towelling, they are in the shape of a bib. The other ones are two-ply with material on the front and plastic backing.

"With the industrial washing and drying at very high temperatures, which they do at the care facilities, the Velcro perishes and the material shrinks, they lose all their colour and they look very, very ordinary."

Margarete, who is in Yass in NSW, has spent several years working as a chef in aged care facility kitchens. Marianne has spent the last 12 years as the primary carer for her aged mother, both of whom are now living at St George's Basin, NSW.

They looked at the problem and decided they could something better.

 

DIGNIFIED DINING: Spillwear is currently offered in Picasso, Green Ceramic and Denim Look designs.
DIGNIFIED DINING: Spillwear is currently offered in Picasso, Green Ceramic and Denim Look designs.

In late December 2016 Marianne and Margarete launched their first Spillwear design.

It's made of polyester and polyurethane laminated.

They are colourful, easy to wipe down, crush, shrink and tear resistant, and can be washed in industrial machines.

Each has a resin zipper which makes it easier to be put on and taken off when the zipper is open.

The garments come in medium and large, and cost $35.

"They can give people a little bit more dignity."

"We have designed this garment for a better fit by sculpting the garment from the shoulder to the underarm just like an ordinary sleeveless garment so that the garment will sit better against the body."

"They can give people a little bit more dignity."

Marianne has been working on four more styles, different colour choices and more print choices including indigenous and masculines ones, which she hopes to release soon.

For more information, go to http://www.thecaringfactor.com/

Topics:  aged care fashion general-seniors-news health


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