The AEC is helping voters to understand their options.
The AEC is helping voters to understand their options. Contributed

AEC highlights voter options for federal election

THE Australian Electoral Commission is highlighting a range of options available to Seniors who face difficulties voting in the federal election on Saturday, May 18.

Selected hospitals and nursing homes have access to mobile teams on election day who will visit voters unable to get to a polling place.

The AEC is working hard this week to make sure all Australians are aware of assistance in making their vote count.

Eligible voters working in a caring role also have a range of voting options available.

And if you are away from home (or even overseas) on election day, there are more than 500 early voting centres around Australia for those travelling interstate?

If travelling overseas this week, it is best to complete an early vote or alternatively there is an option to visit one of 90 overseas voting centres.

The AEC says it is important to note that voting is different in state and federal elections, and advises to make use of a handy practise voting tool on its website where you can understand how to complete the House of Representatives (green) and Senate (white) ballot papers. Visit here to find out more.

If you are unwell or unable to get to a polling place on election day there is a range of voting options available, including:

. Ordinary vote - you can vote at one of around 7000 polling places on election day from 8am to 6pm.

. Absent vote - If you are outside of your electorate on election day, but within your home state or territory, you can cast an absent vote at your nearest polling place.

. Interstate vote - If you are outside of your home state or territory, you can vote at a designated interstate voting centre.

. Early vote (pre-poll) - If you can't make it to a polling place on election day you may be entitled to vote early, either in person or via post. You must have a valid reason for voting early. To find out more, click here

. Overseas vote - If you are overseas on election day, you can vote in person at one of around 90 overseas voting centres or apply for a postal vote. To find out more, click here

. Mobile polling-place vote - People living in remote communities, at mine sites, or in prisons and selected hospitals and nursing homes, may be able to cast a vote when an AEC mobile polling booth visits them.

. Postal vote - if you are entitled to vote early, you can apply for a postal vote here . If you can't apply online, hardcopy application forms are also available at all Australia Post and AEC offices.

There are additional provisions available for electors who do not wish to attend a polling place on the day or have special requirements such as low-vision or blindness.

In addition, if your relative has dementia and is no longer capable of understanding enrolling and voting, you can complete a form to remove their name from the electoral roll.

The locations of some polling places have changed since the previous federal election. To find the location of your nearest voting centre, visit here  or call 13 23 26.

The AEC is reminding people that voting is compulsory if you are on the electoral roll, and that voting more than once is a criminal offence.


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