ON THE WALL: Saltwater Freshwater art being hung at Coffs Gallery with guest curator Djon Mundine with Lewis John Knox's work, Church after the Fire.
ON THE WALL: Saltwater Freshwater art being hung at Coffs Gallery with guest curator Djon Mundine with Lewis John Knox's work, Church after the Fire. Trevor Veale

A marvel of Aboriginal art on display in Coffs

ESTEEMED Aboriginal art curator Djon Mundine OAM has marvelled at the indigenous artworks that have gone on display as part of the Saltwater Freshwater Art exhibition at the Coffs Harbour Gallery.

A member of the Bandjalung people of northern New South Wales, Mr Mundine, who is regarded as a pioneer indigenous curator, said it's fitting he is this year judging an indigenous art display of such signficance.

Saltwater Freshwater opened to the public yesterday and works from Aboriginal artists living in the Worimi, Biripi, Dunghutti and Gumbaynggirr nations will remain on display until February 25.

A highlight for this year will see the Saltwater Freshwater Arts Alliance launch a $5,000 annual art award to one participating artist.

A contemporary cultural objects exhibition includes three dimensional cultural objects such as fish traps, bark canoes, dili bags and coolamons.

The National Aboriginal Design Agency is also displaying pieces from its Sit Place, including the 'comeback' coffee table, an art deco inspired Aboriginal clock, an Aboriginal lace curtain and ceramic drinking vessels.

The final part of this exhibition features a display of old photographs collected from Aboriginal people living in our region; entitled Valuing our Past for a New Beginning.

This will be the beginning of tracing the historical values of the four Saltwater Freshwater nations communities, creating conversations about our past and the people who lived here.

Also on display are two short films by Dunghutti woman and Aboriginal filmmaker, Darlene Johnson. Bluey and Two Bob Mermaid.

Drop into the Coffs Harbour Regional Art Gallery and immerse yourself in our region's Aboriginal art and culture.

 

Djon Mudine was Research Professor at Minpaku Museum of Ethnology in Osaka between 2005-2006 and served as the Senior Curator for the Gallery of Aboriginal Australia, National Museum of Australia, Canberra until 2000, after serving as Senior Curator of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Programs at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

His workshop and performance-projection exhibition Bungarees Farm won the Australian Museums and Art Galleries Exhibition of the Year Award in 2015.


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